“You Have to Start a Thing” a Quick Introduction to Some Self-Starting Ladies of Biltmore Village: 52 Weeks 52 Communities

March is Women's History Month, and I would never forgive myself if I didn't share some of the amazing photos we have in our collection of some of the incredible women who lived their lives, in whole or part, in the Biltmore Village community. Beyond the "Lady on the Hill" there are some fascinating stories … Continue reading “You Have to Start a Thing” a Quick Introduction to Some Self-Starting Ladies of Biltmore Village: 52 Weeks 52 Communities

Event: Becky Stone Portrays Civil Rights Activist Pauli Murray

In Celebration of Women's History Month Becky Stone Portrays Civil Rights Activist Pauli Murray Thursday March 28, 2019 from 6:00 to 7:00 Lord Auditorium, Pack Memorial Library, Lower Level All events are free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served I Pauli Murray was a published poet. An Episcopal Priest. An Attorney and … Continue reading Event: Becky Stone Portrays Civil Rights Activist Pauli Murray

Building Biltmore Forest: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

When you think of Biltmore Forest the first thing that comes to mind is probably a sea of early 20th century wealthy white golfers. In this week's edition of 52 Weeks, 52 Communities we're sharing an Oral History from our archives that sheds light on the construction of Biltmore Forest by African American workers. Take a look … Continue reading Building Biltmore Forest: 52 Weeks, 52 Communities

Do you Remember the Bent Creek Ranch? : 52 Weeks 52 Communities

The Bent Creek Ranch was a hot vacation spot for equestrians from all over the country in the mid-twentieth century. The lodge and guest cabins provided a nice getaway from the hustle and bustle of modern life – a step back into “simpler times.” A postcard sent to a Nashville couple from the Bent Creek … Continue reading Do you Remember the Bent Creek Ranch? : 52 Weeks 52 Communities

52 Weeks, 52 Communities: Barnardsville,What’s in the North Carolina Collection?

Fetching its name from Hezekiah Barnard, who owned stock stand and inn near the Forks of Ivy in the 19th century, Barnardsville is one of Buncombe County’s most rural communities. Things get a little fuzzy on where exactly Barnardsville ends and Democrat and Dillingham begin, but we'll get into that when we look at those … Continue reading 52 Weeks, 52 Communities: Barnardsville,What’s in the North Carolina Collection?

Asheville’s Listings in The Green Book

  Victor H. Ring may not have coined the phrase "driving while black",  but he understood first-hand the various roadblocks and bumps in the road for black travelers 80 years ago. The first issue of The Negro Motorist Green Book was published in 1937. In fifteen pages, Mr. Green offered a guide to New York … Continue reading Asheville’s Listings in The Green Book

Leonora T. Jackson–Early Asheville School Teacher Was Born a Slave

Lenora T. Jackson 1859-1950 Leonora Tecumseh Jackson died in Asheville in 1950 at the age of 91. Her brief obituary mentioned the schools where she had taught and simply stated that she was “a teacher of 62 years.” Leonora was born in 1859 in Halifax County to Caroline Garrett and Andrew Jackson. She had two … Continue reading Leonora T. Jackson–Early Asheville School Teacher Was Born a Slave

Update on Arden: Some Notes on Enslaved Labor in Buncombe County

We’re posting an addendum to our Instagram post on Arden thanks to the really insightful question posed by local writer Ami Worthen (@amiwhoa) in the comments. Our original post read, “The painting featured depicts “Struan” a home built in the Arden area in 1847 by Alexander Robertson, a wealthy rice planter from South Carolina who … Continue reading Update on Arden: Some Notes on Enslaved Labor in Buncombe County